Mallory Noe-Payne

Reporter - Richmond

Mallory Noe-Payne is an award-winning reporter and producer based in Richmond, Virginia. She's done work for NPR's newscast unit, APM's Marketplace and Public Radio International. 

Although she's a native Virginian, she's also worked for public radio in Boston. There, she helped produce stories about higher education, including a nationally-airing series on the German university system.   In addition to working for WGBH, she's worked at WAMU in Washington D.C. She graduated from Virginia Tech with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. 

For more frequent updates from Richmond, or occasional commentary on rock climbing and vegetable gardening, you can follow Mallory on Twitter @MalloryNoePayne

collegiate-va.org

Although recent international terrorist attacks have shocked the world, they’ve had little impact on the day-to-day lives of most Virginians. But for one private school outside of Richmond, incidents of global terrorism have hit close to home. 

Collegiate School's manicured campus in Richmond's suburbs seems worlds away from the streets of Paris and the neighborhoods of Beirut, but step inside Rhiannon Boyd's classroom and the distance shrinks.

Quirk Hotel's Facebook

Richmond is making headlines, placing in a top spot on “Travel and Leisure Magazine’s” annual “Best Places to Travel List.”

Among Caribbean beaches and European canals, Virginia’s capitol finds itself in good company -- the magazine picked out 50 cities from around the world, and Richmond placed 3rd.

Cited as part of the draw is Quirk, an airy and artsy boutique hotel that opened downtown. The lobby is already decorated for the holidays with a white Christmas tree and festive music.

Creative Commons

Known for years as the Church of the Confederacy, St Paul’s Episcopal Church is just across the street from Capitol Square in Richmond. But the church has announced steps this week to remove certain images of the Confederate Flag from inside the sanctuary – it’s part of an effort at racial reconciliation.

About 2,000 college students in Virginia won’t have to pay back some of their student loans, thanks to a state settlement with the Education Management Corporation. That company owns a handful of for-profit colleges in Virginia that have been under investigation for lying to students about job placement rates and graduates’ salaries. 

Although segregation ended formally in the United States more than fifty years ago, there are places right here in Virginia that are still segregated, and aren’t likely to change anytime soon. Those places are cemeteries. After integration, historically black cemeteries around Virginia fell to the wayside, often unkempt, uncared for, and forgotten.

Buffie Coleman never met her grandmother, she died, before Coleman was born. But as Coleman grew older -- she wanted to learn more.

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