Afternoon and Overnight Classics on WVTF Music

Join Classical 24 hosts Steve Seel, Scott Blankenship, Melissa Ousley, Elena See, Mindy Ratner, Bob Christiansen, Andrea Blain, John Zech, Lynne Warfel, Kevin O'Connor, Valerie Kahler for the best in classical music every day and night. 

You can catch WVTF's Classical Programming during these times:

Monday - Thursday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 8 PM

Friday:  

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 7 PM

Saturday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 11 AM - 1 PM 

Sunday:

  • 12 AM - 7 AM
  • 5 PM - 7 PM

The New York Philharmonic announced Sunday that it has taken action against two prominent musicians over unspecified "misconduct": the orchestra's principal oboist, Liang Wang, and its associate principal trumpeter, Matthew Muckey.

The orchestra said the decision came after a five-month internal investigation, led by a former federal judge. Both musicians dispute the Philharmonic's findings, and while the musicians' union reviews the orchestra's decision, the two have been placed on unpaid leave.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify or Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.

When George Li, the 23-year-old American pianist, revealed his Tiny Desk setlist, one thought came to mind: How will these powerhouse showstoppers sound on an upright piano? The music he intended to play, by Franz Liszt and Vladimir Horowitz, was designed for a real, 7-foot concert grand piano – the kind they used to call "a symphony orchestra in a box."

Renée Fleming is becoming America's go-to singer. The celebrated soprano, who has performed at a broad range of high-profile events off the opera stage, is scheduled to sing at Senator John McCain's memorial service this Saturday at Washington's National Cathedral.

Fleming is slated to sing the Irish standard "Danny Boy" — at McCain's request — alongside tributes to the late Senator by Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, and a homily by Bay Area Catholic leader Father Edward A. Reese.

A few weeks before the 2016 presidential election, composer Gabriel Kahane decided he needed to take a journey. On Nov. 9, 2016, the day after the votes were counted, Kahane boarded an Amtrak train in Penn Station in New York City. He left his smartphone behind. He unplugged from the Internet. And he spent the next two weeks riding across the country, talking to people.

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