Civil War Series

The Civil War Series with Dr. James Robertson, Jr.

Thanks for visiting this page on our web site. We are continuing the digitizing from master recordings of this popular series first broadcast on WVTF September 3, 1994 and on subsequent Fridays for nearly 14 years. We will make segments from our archives available to you each week so you can listen through our web site or via the Civil War series podcast. 

The process of revitalizing these radio treasures, in order to make them available to an international audience over the Internet and podcasts, is a labor intensive undertaking. We would greatly appreciate your financial support to sustain the series on line and through podcasts. 

The Civil War Series is sponsored by Virginia Tech's Center for Civil War Studies.  

 

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Originally aired on November 11, 1994 - In part 11 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson provides proof that Johnny Rebs and Billy Yanks came in every size and shape and every background.

#11 – Common Soldiers: Ages and Sizes

Johnny Rebs and Billy Yanks who fought in the great Civil War came in every shape and size, and from every background.

Originally aired on November 18, 1994 - In part 12 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson provides the story behind that famous speech President Lincoln gave in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19, 1863

#12 – The Gettysburg Address

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Originally aired on November 25, 1994 - In part 13 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson relates the story of two old friends, Lewis Armistead and Winfield Hancock, who crossed paths during the July 3, 1863 battle known as Pickett’s Charge. They were on opposing sides of the conflict.

#13 – Armistead – Hancock

danvillevthistorical.org

Originally aired on December 02, 1994 - In part 14 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson tells us about one of Danville, Virginia’s darkest hours during the Civil War.

#14 – Danville Prisons

Danville is a quiet, lovely city, situated in south-side Virginia and perched on the North Carolina border. At the time of the Civil War, Danville was isolated. The Richmond & Danville Railroad was its only major communications link with the war in the Old Dominion. 

Originally aired on December 09, 1994 - In part 15 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson discusses the horrible battle at Fredericksburg, Virginia.

#15 – Fredericksburg

      Civil War armies usually went into winter quarters with the onset of cold weather. Only occasionally would they campaign when temperatures were uncomfortably low. Such a battle occurred in Virginia. Speak militarily of December in this state, and immediately there comes to mind the word “Fredericksburg”.

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