Mallory Noe-Payne

Reporter - Richmond

Mallory Noe-Payne is a national award-winning reporter and producer based in Richmond, Virginia. She's done work for NPR, Marketplace and Public Radio International. 

In five years covering state politics and policy her work has helped advocates get better benefits for home health care workers, raise state standards for archeological digs in historical sites, and fund more clerks in Virginia's court system. She's reported on the aftermath of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, the blackface controversy surrounding Virginia's executive leadership, and multiple history-making election nights

Although she's a native Virginian, she's also worked for public radio in Boston. There, she helped produce stories about higher education, including a nationally-airing series on the German university system.   In addition to working for WGBH, she's worked at WAMU in Washington D.C. She graduated from Virginia Tech with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. Her work has been honored with national awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Public Media Journalists Association. She's also won multiple regional Murrows.  

You can follow Mallory on Twitter @MalloryNoePayne

It’s the time of year to sign up for health care. This year is the third that Virginians can shop around for policies through the Affordable Care Act -- or ObamaCare -- marketplace.

The question now is how many people will sign up again this year. Last year, 34-percent of those eligible for health-care through the marketplace participated. A number on par with the national average, says Massey Whorley, a healthcare policy analyst at The Commonwealth Institute, a liberal-leaning think tank in Richmond.

 As we’ve been hearing this week -- Tuesday’s state-wide elections will determine Virginia’s lawmakers for the next two years. Also at stake: which party will control Virginia’s State Senate.  But just what is the effect of who controls the state senate? 

Virginia’s Governor is a Democrat, and it’s legislature is controlled completely by Republicans. But, if Democrats win just one extra seat on Tuesday.. that could change.

We’ve been looking this week at critical political races happening in the state this election year -- races that could determine which party has control of the state senate. What happens with those seats will depend largely on who comes out to vote.

When there’s no presidential name on the top of a ticket, it’s called an off-year election. And turn out-numbers for off-year elections? According to Quentin Kidd, a political analyst at Christopher Newport University, they aren’t so hot.

Voters across Virginia will be heading to the polls next week. At stake? Each of the state’s 140 lawmakers that make up the General Assembly. You may not have heard much about it though, because many seats are uncontested and not generating much attention. But some state senate races are the exception. Who wins these races could determine the shape of Virginia politics for the next two years. 

Wayne Boese has always cared about local politics. 

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Environmental projects in Virginia are getting a big boon. The state is receiving nearly $8 million in funding to help clean the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.

In addition to matching support from private companies, the funds come largely from the federal government.

“Restoring the bay is imminently doable, we just need to ramp up our efforts and we need to think creatively and we need to think innovatively," says Jeff Corbin with the EPA.

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