Afternoon and Overnight Classics on WVTF Music

Join Classical 24 hosts Steve Seel, Scott Blankenship, Melissa Ousley, Elena See, Mindy Ratner, Bob Christiansen, Andrea Blain, John Zech, Lynne Warfel, Kevin O'Connor, Valerie Kahler for the best in classical music every day and night. 

You can catch WVTF's Classical Programming during these times:

Monday - Thursday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 8 PM

Friday:  

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 7 PM

Saturday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 11 AM - 1 PM 

Sunday:

  • 12 AM - 7 AM
  • 5 PM - 7 PM

Updated at 9:46 p.m. ET

A union representing 800 backstage workers at New York's Metropolitan Opera began a publicity campaign today urging donors and government entities to withdraw support for the company because of a labor dispute.

Kev Marcus and Wil Baptiste — two artists from Fort Lauderdale, Fla. — met 25 years ago, in a high school orchestra class. Growing up, neither one had had much exposure to classical music; both said their parents were more likely to listen to reggae or calypso. Classical music felt like it was supposed to be for other people, which had the effect of drawing them even closer to it. Today, they play as a duo, with Marcus on violin and Baptiste on viola.

In the 1920s, the Russian physicist Leon Theremin debuted an electronic instrument that could be played without any physical contact. Players stood in front of a box and waved their hands over antennas, summoning otherworldly sounds seemingly from thin air.

Will Liverman is a young baritone and a new, exciting voice in the opera world. He is also on something of a mission.

In school, the artist was rarely introduced to Black composers. It was a cumulative interest, patched together by YouTube clips and introductions from colleagues. Now, he wants to expose listeners to music that he feels doesn't get programmed enough in concert halls or receive enough airplay on classical radio stations.

The Tiny Desk is working from home for the foreseeable future. Introducing NPR Music's Tiny Desk (home) concerts, bringing you performances from across the country and the world. It's the same spirit — stripped-down sets, an intimate setting — just a different space.


There's a distinct dissonance between the bucolic setting of this lovely Max Richter Tiny Desk (home) concert and the reality he references after his performance.

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