All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4pm to 6pm on Radio IQ

Much has changed on All Things Considered since the program debuted on May 3, 1971. But there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country.

All Things Considered airs Monday - Friday from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm on RADIO IQ. On the weekends, ATC is on 5:00-6:00 pm on RADIO IQ.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

On January 6, thousands of rioters pushed past police barriers, defied police orders to retreat and illegally broke into the U.S. Capitol building. Police officers were injured trying to control the crowd. One was killed. Now we are learning that some of the rioters were sworn officers themselves. I'm joined now by Kimberly Kindy. She's an investigative reporter for The Washington Post.

Hey there.

KIMBERLY KINDY: Hey, thanks for having me.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

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