All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4:00 pm to 6:30 pm on WVTF/RADIO IQ.

Much has changed on All Things Considered since the program debuted on May 3, 1971. But there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

All Things Considered airs Monday - Friday from 4:00 pm to 6:30 pm on WVTF and RADIO IQ. On the weekends, ATC is on 5:00-6:00 pm on WVTF and 6:00-7:00 PM on RADIO IQ.

Herman Ware sits at a small, wobbly table inside a large van that's been converted into a mobile health clinic. The van is parked on a trash-strewn, dead-end street in downtown Atlanta where homeless residents congregate.

Ware is here for a seasonal flu shot.

"It might sting," he says, thinking back on past shots.

Ware grimaces slightly as the nurse injects his upper arm.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

When you're homeless, it's not easy to see a doctor. That's where street medicine comes in. It's an emerging practice, and it can be found in dozens of cities, including Atlanta. That's where Sam Whitehead of member station WABE followed a medical team that visits patients living on the streets.

SAM WHITEHEAD, BYLINE: It's late afternoon, and a van filled with medical supplies idles near an interstate overpass in Atlanta. Herman Ware is getting a flu shot.

HERMAN WARE: Oh, it might sting. Yup, I figured that (laughter).

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

When you're homeless, it's not easy to see a doctor. That's where street medicine comes in. It's an emerging practice, and it can be found in dozens of cities, including Atlanta. That's where Sam Whitehead of member station WABE followed a medical team that visits patients living on the streets.

SAM WHITEHEAD, BYLINE: It's late afternoon, and a van filled with medical supplies idles near an interstate overpass in Atlanta. Herman Ware is getting a flu shot.

HERMAN WARE: Oh, it might sting. Yup, I figured that (laughter).

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

When you're homeless, it's not easy to see a doctor. That's where street medicine comes in. It's an emerging practice, and it can be found in dozens of cities, including Atlanta. That's where Sam Whitehead of member station WABE followed a medical team that visits patients living on the streets.

SAM WHITEHEAD, BYLINE: It's late afternoon, and a van filled with medical supplies idles near an interstate overpass in Atlanta. Herman Ware is getting a flu shot.

HERMAN WARE: Oh, it might sting. Yup, I figured that (laughter).

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

When you're homeless, it's not easy to see a doctor. That's where street medicine comes in. It's an emerging practice, and it can be found in dozens of cities, including Atlanta. That's where Sam Whitehead of member station WABE followed a medical team that visits patients living on the streets.

SAM WHITEHEAD, BYLINE: It's late afternoon, and a van filled with medical supplies idles near an interstate overpass in Atlanta. Herman Ware is getting a flu shot.

HERMAN WARE: Oh, it might sting. Yup, I figured that (laughter).

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