Jazz Tonight with Leslie Keros

Monday-Thursday 8-midnight on WVTF Music
  • Hosted by Leslie Keros

Born and raised in the Detroit area, Leslie Keros has been steeped in music since she can remember, taking classical piano lessons, singing in youth and adult choirs, and attending fine arts camp in the summer. She first heard jazz on the radio in her youth, and her love for the music continued after she moved to Chicago. She has hosted jazz and blues shows since 2000. Playlist can be found here.

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