Rising Seas & Sinking Land: How Coastal Virginia is Combating Climate Change

Credit Sandy Hausman/Radio IQ

For the next few months Pamela D'Angelo is traveling around the Chesapeake Bay looking at how climate change is impacting neighborhoods and potential solutions being considered as lands continue to sink and flooding increases.

Izaak Hagy

An organization seeking to hold big oil accountable for global warming estimates it will cost more than $31 billion for Virginia to protect coastal communities from sea-level rise.

Pamela D'Angelo

Last year, Gov. Ralph Northam appointed retired Navy Admiral Ann Phillips to spearhead efforts for coastal adaptation to climate change.

After nearly 31 years in the Navy where she implemented climate change adaptation plans, she is traveling the state putting together a coastal master plan. 

NASA Aims for Space and Battles Erosion on Wallops Island

Apr 17, 2019
Pamela D'Angelo

NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore sits at the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. 

It's a climate change hot spot, where rising waters and stronger storms are eroding about 12 feet of shoreline every year.  For NASA, science and persistence are major tools in climate resilience.

How Forests Help Mitigate Flooding

Mar 14, 2019

Trees are big money in Virginia, generating some $21 billion each year, according to the state department of Forestry. Another $6.6 billion is attributed to forest contribution to air and water quality.

Now, the city of Virginia Beach is looking at the value of the city's forests as one solution to their flooding problems caused by climate change and the region's sinking lands.

For neighborhoods along the Atlantic coast and the Chesapeake Bay, recurrent flooding that comes with climate change makes it hard to navigate, especially during seasonal high tides and more frequent extreme wind events like Nor'easters.

Now, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science has a tool to help people throughout the region prepare for a flood.

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