Civil War Series

The Civil War Series with Dr. James Robertson, Jr.

Thanks for visiting this page on our web site. We are continuing the digitizing from master recordings of this popular series first broadcast on WVTF September 3, 1994 and on subsequent Fridays for nearly 14 years. We will make segments from our archives available to you each week so you can listen through our web site or via the Civil War series podcast. 

The process of revitalizing these radio treasures, in order to make them available to an international audience over the Internet and podcasts, is a labor intensive undertaking. We would greatly appreciate your financial support to sustain the series on line and through podcasts. 

The Civil War Series is sponsored by Virginia Tech's Center for Civil War Studies.  

 

Britannica

Originally aired on June 09, 1995 - In part 41 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson describes the horror on the battlefield during the 1863 Battle at

Chancellorsville. Here,  General Lee won his most spectacular victory but lost his most dependable lieutenant, Stonewall Jackson.

#41 – The Real Picture of War

Moses Ezekiel

Dec 25, 2019
www.civilwar.org

Originally aired on June 16, 1995 - In part 42 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson gives an account of the life of Civil War soldier and prolific sculptor, Moses Ezekiel.

#42 – Moses J. Ezekiel

etc.usf.edu

Originally aired on June 23, 1995 - In part 43 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson shares the incident of Stonewall Jackson becoming hilariously drunk.

#43 – “Stonewall” Jackson Becomes Intoxicated

Gettysburg

Dec 23, 2019

Originally aired on June 30, 1995 - In part 44 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson discusses one of two battles of July 1863 that turned the tide of the War and marked the Confederacy for defeat: the Battle of Gettysburg.

#44 – Gettysburg

In the first week of July, 1863, the Union won two victories that clearly turned the tide of the Civil War and doomed the Confederacy to defeat. Today we look at one of those campaigns. It took place at a small southern Pennsylvania town called Gettysburg.

Vicksburg

Dec 22, 2019
www.sonofthesouth.net

Originally aired on July 07, 1995 - In part 45 of our Civil War series, Virginia Tech history professor James Robertson says that the most important city on the Mississippi to the Confederate cause was Vicksburg. However, the events there in July 1863 showed that Lee’s army was running out of manpower and time.

#45 – Vicksburg

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