Economics & Economy

(U.S. Edition) Scientists with the International Panel on Climate Change have gathered in South Korea and released a report Monday outlining the steps that need to be taken to stop global temperatures from rising by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. It also says that We also examine how goods and services indicate a growing trade deficit, but services alone offer different insights.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service …  A new report on climate change says 2.5 percent of global GDP needs to be spent each year for two decades to stop global warming. We hear from the co-chair of the International Panel on Climate Change. Then, Brazil’s voters handed a previously fringe candidate nearly half the vote in Sunday’s election, but he’ll face a runoff election  at the end of the month after failing to secure a majority. What does that mean for a country facing continued economic hardship?

Almost 40 percent of rural America, or about 23 million people, don't have access to broadband internet or reliable mobile service. Long term, this digital divide is a huge economic problem. Companies need high-skilled workers, and people without decent internet access can't find those jobs or get the training they might need to do them. Now the Fed is trying convince businesses that the digital divide is their problem, too, Jeremy Hegle told us. He's a senior community development adviser for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

Almost 40 percent of rural America, or about 23 million people, don't have access to broadband internet or reliable mobile service. Long term, this digital divide is a huge economic problem. Companies need high-skilled workers, and people without decent internet access can't find those jobs or get the training they might need to do them. Now the Fed is trying convince businesses that the digital divide is their problem, too, Jeremy Hegle told us. He's a senior community development adviser for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

When we report on the world's thirst for energy, we often miss something: chemicals made from oil and gas. A new report today finds petrochemical demand in the world is surging for things like synthetic rubber, packaging, fertilizer and detergents. In the long run, chemicals may be a bigger driver of world oil demand than even driving.

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