Afternoon and Overnight Classics on WVTF Music

Join Classical 24 hosts Steve Seel, Scott Blankenship, Melissa Ousley, Elena See, Mindy Ratner, Bob Christiansen, Andrea Blain, John Zech, Lynne Warfel, Kevin O'Connor, Valerie Kahler for the best in classical music every day and night. 

You can catch WVTF's Classical Programming during these times:

Monday - Thursday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 8 PM

Friday:  

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 7 PM

Saturday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 11 AM - 1 PM 

Sunday:

  • 12 AM - 7 AM
  • 5 PM - 7 PM

Caroline Shaw's new album, Orange, is a love letter to the string quartet. The North Carolina native burst onto the music scene in 2013, when she was the youngest composer to win a Pulitzer Prize. She's still in her 30s and now, for the first time, there's a recording devoted entirely to her work.

Ellen Reid, a 36-year-old composer, won the Pulitzer Prize in Music on Monday for her opera p r i s m. The Pulitzer jury described the winning piece as a "bold new operatic work that uses sophisticated vocal writing and striking instrumental timbres to confront difficult subject matter: the effects of sexual and emotional abuse." The two other finalists were Sustain, an orchestral work by Andrew Norman, and Still for solo piano by James Romig. Reid is the fourth woman to earn the prize since 2013.

In January 2018, the Hungarian State Opera in Budapest was widely criticized for staging the George Gershwin opera Porgy and Bess — whose story wrestles with racism, drug abuse and poverty — with a predominantly white cast, despite the fact that the Gershwin estate requires performances to feature an all-black cast.

Now, the Hungarian production is back for another series of performances of Porgy this month — and its nearly all-white cast was reportedly asked to sign testimonials saying that they were African-American.

Ever since he was a little boy, Yannick Nézet-Séguin knew he wanted to be a conductor. He likens the feeling to something "almost like a religious call."

"Making music in the group is what animates me," he says.

No composition seems too difficult for pianist Lang Lang. But on his latest solo record, Piano Book, the 36-year-old known for his finger-twisting virtuosity is exploring something simpler: Beethoven's "Fur Elise," Debussy's "Clair de Lune" and other pieces that accompanied him in the first few years of a lifelong love-affair with the instrument.

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