Afternoon and Overnight Classics on WVTF Music

Join Classical 24 hosts Steve Seel, Scott Blankenship, Melissa Ousley, Elena See, Mindy Ratner, Bob Christiansen, Andrea Blain, John Zech, Lynne Warfel, Kevin O'Connor, Valerie Kahler for the best in classical music every day and night. 

You can catch WVTF's Classical Programming during these times:

Monday - Thursday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 8 PM

Friday:  

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 2 PM  - 7 PM

Saturday:

  • 12 AM - 9 AM 
  • 11 AM - 1 PM 

Sunday:

  • 12 AM - 7 AM
  • 5 PM - 7 PM

Osvaldo Golijov is a MacArthur "genius" composer who's written for Yo-Yo Ma, Kronos Quartet and soprano Dawn Upshaw. But in 2012, he was accused of plagiarism, and he disappeared from the scene. Only now, nearly a decade later, is Golijov reemerging — with a work that could not have a more timely subject: it's a meditation on grieving and loss.

For members of Luminous Voices, a professional choir ensemble in Alberta, Canada, rehearsing and performing safely during the pandemic has meant getting into their cars, driving to an empty parking lot and singing with each other's voices broadcast through their car radios.

This "car choir" solution is one that college music professor David Newman — an accomplished baritone himself in Virginia — came up with so that ensembles could sing and "be" together.

Meet internationally-acclaimed author Alexander McCall Smith (No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency) and award-winning composer James Ross, who collaborated on song cycle These Are The Hands. Host Fiona Ritchie chatted with them about the process of bringing together the lyrics (McCall Smith) and the piano arrangements (Ross).

The year 2020 was, in so many ways, divided. In terms of live performances, musicians were forced to reinvent, reflect and respond from a distance and in turn I watched their concerts from the remove of my laptop screen.

Two-hundred-fifty years ago, a musical maverick was born. Ludwig van Beethoven charted a powerful new course in music. His ideas may have been rooted in the work of European predecessors Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Josef Haydn, but the iconic German composer became who he was with the help of some familiar American values: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

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