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It's Been A Minute
Saturday at Noon on Radio IQ

Each week, It's Been a Minute features people in the culture who deserve your attention.

Plus weekly wraps of the news with journalists in the know. Join us to make sense of the world through conversation.

It's Been a Minute episodes
  • Brittany feels like we've entered a new phase of celebrity oligarchy; new celebrity business enterprises are popping up daily, and we can't seem to get away from it all. But is this new? Brittany invites culture journalists Bobby Finger and Lindsey Weber to discuss how the notion of celebrity is changing, and what it means for us. Then, we turn to Hayao Miyazaki, the legendary animator-director whose latest film, The Boy and the Heron, is a frontrunner at this year's Academy Awards. Brittany is joined by Jessica Neibel, Senior Exhibitions Curator at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, to unpack the life lessons Miyazaki's films offer, from the unreliability of adults to the messages of resilience rooted in Miyazaki's own postwar childhood.If you have 10 minutes, please do the team at It's Been a Minute a huge favor by taking a short, anonymous survey about the show at npr.org/ibamsurvey. Tell us what you like and how we could improve the show!Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Jada Pinkett Smith is the kind of celebrity that makes headlines just by breathing. But looking at those headlines — mostly about her marriage to fellow actor, Will Smith — made host Brittany Luse think that most people have gotten Jada all wrong. A graduate of the Baltimore School for the Arts, Jada's best known for her acting, but she's also a producer, musician, and painter. After reading her memoir, Worthy, Brittany noticed the way Jada's artistic mind and process had been overlooked. So, she sat down with Jada to ask about it. They talked about what Jada's painting, what she got out of her time as a rock singer, why she looks at her relationship with Will as a masterpiece, and what she wants for her future.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Choreographer Fatima Robinson has had an incredibly prolific career: she gave us the iconic King Tut-style moves from Michael Jackson's 'Remember the Time' music video, she taught us how to 'Rock the Boat' with Aaliyah, and she was head choreographer on Beyoncé's Renaissance tour. And all through that time, she's moved through all kinds of changes in how we dance – including Tik Tok. Host Brittany Luse chats with Robinson about how she pulls rhythm out of stars – and what causes the dance moves of the day to change.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • This week, we're asking: do the fantasies we read in romance novels say anything about what we want in our real-life relationships? Devoted readers share how the genre has impacted their love lives. Host Brittany Luse revisits her conversation with writer Rebekah Weatherspoon about how she builds a world of desire. Then, we revisit our talk with Dr. Gale E. Greenlee, teacher-scholar in residence at the bell hooks center in Berea Kentucky, about lasting impact of bell hooks' work, and how she changed the way we think about love. If you have 10 minutes, please do the team at It's Been a Minute a huge favor by taking a short, anonymous survey about the show at npr.org/ibamsurvey. Tell us what you like and how we could improve the show!Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • This weekend, Vegas hit the jackpot. For the first time ever, Sin City will host the Super Bowl; and the halftime headliner is the current Vegas residency darling - Usher. But, NPR Senior Editor Bilal Qureshi says this royal flush was years in the making. Bilal joins host Brittany Luse to share his experience covering the city's journey from 'Old Vegas' to 'New Vegas,' as new hotels, concert venues, and artist residencies bring Vegas to a new market - millennials. Then, Brittany turns her sights to the Stanley Cup. No, not the hockey championship but the colorful tumblers taking the internet by storm. The frenzy for a new collectible is never surprising, but the very thing that goes inside it - water - has The Wellness Trap author Christy Harrison wondering if this is just another extension of diet and wellness culture gone sideways.If you have 10 minutes, please do the team at It's Been a Minute a huge favor by taking a short, anonymous survey about the show at npr.org/ibamsurvey. Tell us what you like and how we could improve the show!Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • It seems like there are countless streamers these days – there's Netflix, Hulu, Disney Plus, Max, Peacock, Roku, just to name a few. Still, success and profit remain elusive to even some of the biggest in the biz. However there is one smaller streamer that seems to have found a path to prosperity: Dropout. IBAM host Brittany Luse sat down with Dropout CEO Sam Reich to find out how his company is forging a path to success in a successful market, all while revamping the gameshow format. The pair also play a little game.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Charlamagne tha God has been dominating hip-hop radio for years, and lately, his influence has extended far beyond the music industry; for better or worse, Charlamagne has become one of the go-to voices for political discourse in the Black community. And while his comments often resonate with The Breakfast Club audience, they've also been picked up by political operatives across party lines. This week, Brittany sits down with Democratic pollster Terrance Woodbury and POLITICO National Correspondent Brakkton Booker to discuss Charlamagne's power as a pundit and if tha God's politics are indicative of larger trends among Black voters. Then, Brittany turns to a classic television show that just celebrated it's 25th anniversary: HBO's The Sopranos. Although the show wrapped years ago, it remains a deeply salient portrayal of assimilation and conditional whiteness. Brittany chats with author Morgan Jerkins about whiteness in America and why the show's commentary on Italian Americans resonated with them as Black women. To end the show, Brittany passes the mic to music journalist Naima Cochrane to answer a question about the Nicki Minaj and Megan thee Stallion beef.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • We're taking it way back — all the way to college. This episode is a mini-reunion: host Brittany Luse and Ayesha Rascoe, host of NPR's Weekend Edition, are both alumnae of Howard University — they even attended during some of the same years. Howard is an HBCU: a historically Black college or university. There are around a hundred in the US, and they've had a big impact on both graduates and American culture writ large. Ayesha has edited a book of essays all about that impact, called HBCU Made: A Celebration of the Black College Experience. Brittany chats with her about the book and what makes HBCUs special — they also trade tales from their own time as students.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • This morning, the International Court of Justice shared a decision on South Africa's genocide case against Israel. The courts found sufficient evidence that it's "plausible" that Israel has committed acts of genocide in Gaza and ruled that Israel must prevent genocidal attacks. Earlier this week, host Brittany Luse sat down with South African journalist Redi Tlhabi to look at the context of this story and lay out how the histories of Israel and South Africa factor into this moment. Then, Brittany chats with Professor Poulomi Saha about America's obsession with cults. With so many shows choose from, cult documentaries could now be seen as their own genre. But what might our fascination with cults reveal about society's shortfalls?Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Director and actor Benny Safdie is probably best known for co-directing the film Uncut Gems, but he's also acted in Oppenheimer, Licorice Pizza, and one of host Brittany Luse's personal favorites: Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret. In his latest project, Safdie co-created and acts in Showtime's The Curse. It's an intensely uncomfortable examination of the smoke and mirrors behind your favorite home improvement shows, but it's also a marriage drama – and it picks apart our desire to seem like good people, rather than being good people. Host Brittany Luse sits down with Safdie to learn what makes home improvement shows both soothing and sinister — and the difference between do-gooders and seem-gooders. They also play a game where they're forced to distinguish reality from fiction.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy