african-american history

Building A Road Map For Teaching About Slavery

Feb 14, 2018
The Montpelier Foundation

It is a question that has long vexed America: How do we teach our history of slavery?  This month, James Madison’s Montpelier started working on an answer.

Jordy Yager

The Slave Dwelling Project recently held its largest ever event at the University of Virginia to commemorate the hundreds of enslaved men, women and children who built and ran the school in the 19th century. Nearly 3-dozen panels saw more than 100 speakers over the three days. But at the center was an outdoor sleepover in near freezing temperatures, where the enslaved would have slept.

Mallory Noe-Payne

 

Virginia police once threw Richard and Mildred Loving into jail. She was black and he was white, and they had gotten married. It was 1958, and in Virginia that was against the law. Monday marks 50 years since the Loving’s won a case before the Supreme Court and Virginia law was overturned.

 

Another Virginia couple, Charlie and Marcia Russell, traveled to Richmond Monday to honor the Lovings.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIO IQ

Every year since 1997, Virginia taxpayer money goes to repairing and restoring the graves of Confederate soldiers. Now, for the first time, the state has approved funding for history that has long been ignored: African-American cemeteries.

The Virginia Slave Who Mailed Himself to Freedom

Mar 2, 2017
Pamela D'Angelo

 

Henry “Box” Brown was a born into slavery in Louisa County. At 15, he was sent to Richmond. 

 

Today, a group of musicians has chosen to honor Brown's story with a song about his escape. They performed recently during a Black History Celebration on Virginia’s Northern Neck. 

 

In front of an audience, many of whom were descendants of slaves, Glenn Birch told the story of Brown's unusual and daring journey. 

 

Pages