Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

In March 2009, Wall Street was a fearful and anxious place, where fortunes had been decimated and retirement funds deflated.

What few people could foresee in the depths of the Great Recession was that the stock market was also on the verge of a historic recovery, one that persists today. The decadelong run is also raising caution flags for some analysts who worry that investors are accepting too much risk.

Stocks are finishing 2019 on a remarkable upswing, with all of the major indexes hitting record highs and the S&P 500 up nearly 30% for the year.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

This was the year that President Trump's trade strategy began showing results - a revised NAFTA sailed through the U.S. House; the administration got a trade deal with China. But as NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, some of the thorniest trade problems remain unsolved.

Boeing CEO Steps Down

Dec 23, 2019

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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If there's one company that can slow U.S. growth to a crawl, it's Boeing.

The aircraft and aerospace giant is so important to the economy — it's the No. 1 exporter — that its decision this week to suspend production of its troubled 737 Max airplane is expected to reverberate throughout the manufacturing sector.

Several analysts project that the move will slash economic growth by half a percentage point and eventually lead to layoffs.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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There's a ceasefire in the trade war between the United States and China. The two countries confirmed yesterday they'll sign what they're calling the first phase of an agreement that addresses some of the trade frictions between them.

NPR's Jim Zarroli has more.

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