Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Teachers are sometimes faced with some pretty thorny issues when current events make their way into their classrooms.

Often they get limited guidance from administrators or school boards on what to say and do, but an earlier generation of teachers is stepping up with advice.

Sandy Hausman/Radio IQ

The White House is expected to announce President Trump’s choice to succeed Justice Kennedy on the Supreme Court Monday and Democrats say they’re ready for a fight.  Virginia Senator Tim Kaine shared his strategy with a group of supporters over the weekend.

Sandy Hausman/Radio IQ

Retailers in this country spend billions of dollars on marketing.  Toy stores, for example, devote an average of ten percent of their profits to ads, but a small shop in Charlottesville is doing something different and reporting great success. 

Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP

The Ohio man charged with driving his car into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville last summer has plead not guilty to 30 counts of hate crimes which led to the death of 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuries to 19 others.

For decades, healthcare companies have been trying to bring costs down or, at least, to keep them from rising so much. 

Now, this area’s largest commercial insurer says it’s succeeded beyond expectation.

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